Barn Fire Kills Beloved Animals

Barn Fire Kills Beloved Animals

A story brought to you by abc4 news brings news of a fire in Utah County that killed  4 horses and 13 goats. The family was outside with their animals with a small fire in a 50 gallon drum to keep them warm. Fire officials believe that when they left, the wind picked up, and an ember was carried to the barn. One of the animal owners, Jorge Rubio said, “The fire that was here was contained. It wasn’t even a lot.” But it was enough to trap the animals, and when the fire started, no one was around to save them. Rubio said, “It’s everything for us. This is basically our life, our horses.” He further explained how the farm was owned as a family; they owned the horses all for the kids. a devastating loss for the kids as well as the farm owners as well. “We love our horses and it’s just so hard to see them down there dead.” Along with the animals being killed, the barn was partially destroyed, and most of the animal feed gone completely. The family will have to rebuild a great deal. Abc news has a phone number to call if you are interested in helping the family: 801-372-1621. An event like this is devastating. If you or a loved one have been through a fire, you may be able to get some sort of compensation through the help of a lawyer. Call experts at Christensen & Hymas for a free consultation about your case, to see if we can help you find some justice.   Image courtesy of James...
Fire Displaces Two Families

Fire Displaces Two Families

It seems fires have been a big issue in Utah lately. Yesterday in Millcreek, two families were evacuated from their homes as a fire spread form one to another on Thursday morning. The fire was reported at 12:30 am when the first owner called 911, with news that his carport was on hire. The fire quickly got out of control. Capt. Clint Mccham of the United Fire Authority said, “While (crews) were in the process of making their initial attack, the fire spread both directions, and spread into the house associated with the carport as well as a neighboring house” Other alarms were sent out, calling upon resources from all over the Salt Lake Vallely. The story from KSL.com said, “Within minutes, 63 engines, ladder trucks, ambulances, and police officers arrived on scene and 75 firefighters attacked the spreading flames.” One house had been the home of Robert Ferris and his wife for more than 40 years. But they were both happy and lucky to escape with their lives. They became aware of the rapidly-spreading flames when their chihuahuas started barking. When they heard the explosion of the neighbor’s carport catching fire, they quickly grabbed their dogs and ran outside. It took almost an hour to completely dispel the flames. They estimated $150,000 damage to one home, and $250,000 damage to the second. Neither family was able to return home. Luckily no one got seriously injured. There is still an investigation pending as to the cause of the fire. An accident like this can turn your life upside-down. Dealing with the aftermath of a fire can be overwhelming, and...
Easter Fire in Salt Lake

Easter Fire in Salt Lake

Easter Sunday, a fire caught on a Salt Lake City home. A story from the Salt Lake Tribune gives us details. Near 800 South and 800 West a pile of debris outside a home caught fire around 2:30 pm. The fire quickly spread across the home’s walls and then into the attic. Fire department spokesman Jasen Asay said the firefighters saw smoke and flames, but had the fire under control in about 15 minutes form the time they arrived. Investigators are still determining what caused the debris to ignite, and how much damage was done. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (or FEMA), in the United States each year more than 2,500 people die, and 12,600 are injured in home fires. But there are ways to protect yourself. In just two minutes, a fire can become life-threatening. FEMA gives some tips to prevent home fires: Stay in the kitchen if you are using the stove. If you leave, even for a short amount of time, turn off the stove. Position barbecue grills at least 10 feet away from siding and deck railings, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches. If you smoke, SMOKE OUTSIDE. be aware of cigarette butts, and be alert. Replace worn, old or damaged appliance cords, because frayed wires can quickly cause fires. If you have a fireplace, never burn trash, paper, or green wood. Inspect your chimney and wood stove pipes annually. Check monthly for damage or obstructions. If you or a loved one have been in a fire accident, and do not know the next steps to take, call Christensen & Hymas,...

Apartment Unit Destroyed by Grease Fire

In a news report by abc4 news, a building in West Jordan was destroyed by a grease fire. Saturday night at 3375 West 7800 South caused damage to eight apartment units in a Broadmoor Village Apartment complex. The call to the fire chief, Marc McElreath, came at 9:00 pm,  when more than 40 fire fighters were able to contain the fire within 30 minutes. Only one unit was completely destroyed, but the other seven units effected, have various levels of damage from smoke. It began in the kitchen of a man reportedly deep frying food. The 37-year-old man attempted to curtail the fire by throwing a towel over the flames, but the cloth ignited and the fire grew out of control. The man have oxygen bottles, which he threw outside. Luckily he and his wife escaped the apartment, and were able to evacuate the building. They are both in good condition, but the man burned his hands. Neighbors say that their two dogs were killed by the fire. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, fire trends are going down. In the span of 10 years, the fire death rate per million population decreased 19.6%. The majority of residential building fires and injuries occur because of accidents cooking. Oil, fat and grease are the leading  types of material that cause ignition,  because often used when the cook is focused on many things at once. So when you’re cooking-stay focused, especially on flammable ingredients! If a fire should start, immediately call the authorities, and keep you, your family, and your neighbors safe!   Image courtesy of by Fort George G. Meade Public Affairs...