Woman Falls 15 Feet In Climbing Accident

Woman Falls 15 Feet In Climbing Accident

A woman fell 15 feet in a rock climbing accident in Big Cottonwood Canyon on Monday, according to KSL. The woman, a Southern Utah University student, was rock climbing with some friends when the belay rope slipped and she fell 15 feet. Her brother was able to call 911 and the woman was rescued with a high liner. Nearly 2 hours later she was transported to the hospital via ambulance. The woman fell on her side and complained of back pain, but fortunately didn’t suffer any serious injuries. Ryan Jones, the woman’s brother, says that he thinks the rope was too short for the climb. He says his sister, who is an experienced climber, is excited to climb again, and will be sure to use a longer rope next time. A study done by the Center for Injury Research and Policy of the Research Institute at the Nationwide Children’s Hospital showed a 63% increase in climber related injuries treated in emergency rooms from 1990 to 2007. Also, the study says that “patients who were injured after falling from a height over 20 feet were 10 times more likely to be hospitalized than patients who were injured falling from 20 feet or lower.” Mountain climbing can be a dangerous sport, as indicated by this study. We at Christensen & Hymas are grateful that the woman’s injuries were not critical. If you have been seriously injured in a mountain climbing accident due to someone else’s negligence, please call our law firm at (801) 506-0800 . We specialize in fall related personal injuries, and can help you seek the compensation you may be entitled...
81-year-old Man Burned In Backyard Fire

81-year-old Man Burned In Backyard Fire

An 81-year-old man was burned over 90% of his body while burning weeds in his backyard with a hand-held propane torch, according to KSL. Ray Jessop’s was trying to put out the weed fire, which had started burning some grass, when his pants caught fire. His neighbor found Ray sitting on the porch with most of his clothes burned off. He was taken by helicopter to University of Utah’s Burn Center where he was treated for third degree burns over 90 percent of his body. Fires can quickly get out of control, and cause a lot of damage. The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) reports that in 2011, a fire department responded to a fire every 23 seconds, 3,005 deaths and thousands of injuries occurred because of these fires, and damages were in the 11 billions in cost. The most common types of fires, as reported in 2011 by the NFPA, are structure fires, followed by wildland, and then highway vehicles. Most fires are preventable, and with death numbers in the three thousands each year, it is important to take precautions in regards to fire. In Utah, open burning almost always requires a permit to do so. If a person is starting a fire anywhere besides campfires, grills, or fireplaces, a burn permit is required. The Utah government details the rules regarding open burning with a permit. The consequences of not abiding by these laws are great, and can result in serious injury or death. Christensen & Hymas is knowledgeable about personal injuries involving fires. If you are a burn victim due to someone’s negligence, we can help you...
Motorcycle Accident Kills Man in Provo Canyon

Motorcycle Accident Kills Man in Provo Canyon

KSL reports that on Sunday, May 26th, a man riding a motorcycle on Highway 189 in Provo Canyon died when his motorcycle laid down. A Chevy Blazer, which pulled into the right lane, in front of the motorcycle, was preparing to make a U turn. The motorcycle went down after hitting the SUV’s bumper. The man riding the motorcycle, who was not wearing a helmet, died. His 12-year-old son was also riding on the motorcycle and was rushed to a local hospital; he was wearing a helmet and his injuries are not life threatening. Although helmet use is not required for persons over 18 in Utah (Utah Bike Law), it is strongly encouraged. Wearing or not wearing a helmet can be the difference between life and death. A study done by IHS tracked the history of helmet use in a number of states. The study showed that deaths and brain injuries dramatically decreased when helmet laws covering all riders were enacted, and significantly rose again when those states repealed the laws. For example, in California, in 1992, a helmet law was passed that covered all riders. Helmet use jumped from 50 percent to 90 percent after the law was passed, and motorcyclist fatalities decreased by 37 percent. Photo courtesy of Jason...
Man Pinned to Death in Salt Lake City

Man Pinned to Death in Salt Lake City

Jasen Asay from the Salt Lake City Fire Department disclosed that a man was killed when a large bag weighing at least 2000 pounds containing shredded plastic materials accidentally fell on him. The manager of Mountain Peaks Vinyl found his employee trapped under the bag at about 7:30 in the morning. An emergency crew attempted to cut open the bag to relieve pressure on the 28 year old, but it was already too late; the man died from sustained injury. The identity of the man was undisclosed, but the incident was investigated by officials from Occupational Safety and Health Administration. A number of workers have reported fatalities due to work related accidents. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 4,609 workers were killed on the job in 2011 (3.5 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers). That is almost 90 a week, or nearly 13 deaths every day. This is a slight increase from the 4,551 fatal work injuries in 2009, but the second lowest annual total since the fatal injury census was first conducted in 1992. OSHA is trying to make a difference by working with local partners on how to establish and maintain workers’ safety. As a result of their concerted efforts, worker deaths in America have reduced from about 38 a day in 1970 to 13 a day in 2011. Workers are at risk from falling objects when they are beneath cranes, scaffolds, etc., or where overhead work is being performed. There is a danger from flying objects when power tools are used. Activities like pushing, pulling, or prying may also cause objects to become airborne. Injuries can...

15 Year Old Biker Hit by Trailer Towing Truck

The Utah Department of Public Safety reported that in an average year in Utah, 6 bicyclists are killed and nearly 850 are involved in crashes with motor vehicles. Nearly 60% of bicyclists involved in a bicycle/motor vehicle crash are younger than 20 years of age and more than three-fourths (79%) are male. It looks like there is going to be a recent addition to the statistics mentioned above. KSL.com featured a story about a 15 year old male bicyclist who sustained serious head injuries when he was hit by a trailer-towing truck. The accident happened last Tuesday, May 21 in North Logan. According to the report the boy was crossing Main Street (State route 91) from west to east at 1600 North. A car in the inside lane had stopped to yield to the crossing boy on a bicycle but the driver of an oncoming truck from the outside lane did not see the boy resulting to the collision. Witnesses believed that the truck driver’s view of the boy was blocked by the car in the inner lane. Unfortunately the boy was not wearing a helmet and there is no designated cross walk in the area according to North Park Police Sgt. John Italasano. The area where the accident happened has a strip mall and another shopping center nearby, but the boy was reported alone. An ambulance transported the boy to Logan Regional Medical Center. The boy was later brought to the Primary Children’s Medical Center by a medical helicopter. Police authorities are investigating the collision. The Utah Department of Public Safety identified leading contributing factors of drivers in bicyclist...