Bicycle Laws in Utah

Bicycle Laws in Utah

Utah Bicycle Laws As bicycle use continues to increase, it is important to be aware of laws regarding bicycle use. This pertains to both motorists and bicyclists alike. Here is a summary of Utah bicycle laws that were gathered by the Utah Bicycle Coalition. Some of these laws you may already know, others may come as a surprise. It is illegal to operate a motor vehicle near a bicycle. The driver of an automobile may not knowingly drive within three feet of a moving bicycle. A peace officer may at any time stop a bicyclist to inspect and test the bicycle if the officer has reason to believe that it is unsafe or not equipped according to state laws. All bicyclists must have at least one hand on the steering handlebars at all times. A bicyclist may not carry a bundle, package, pack, or any other article that prohibits him/her from keeping both hands on the handle bars. A bicycle may never carry more persons than it is properly designed for. A bicyclist must never be attached to a moving motorized vehicle. A bicycle may not be equipped with a siren or a horn. Furthermore, a bicycle must be equipped with proper brakes. The brakes must be able to completely stop the bicycle within 25 feet from a speed of 25 miles per hour. When turning right, a bicyclist must extend his/her right hand and arm horizontally to signal to other motorists his/her intent to turn right. A bicyclist is not required to signal by hand or arm continuously if it is needed to maintain proper control of the...
How To Avoid A Dog Bite Attack

How To Avoid A Dog Bite Attack

Remember That Dogs are Animals Most dogs are friendly and benign, rarely lashing out at their owners or other people. However, some dogs may react to certain situations violently and lash out at nearby people. The Humane Society has compiled a collection of tips and guidelines you can follow that will help prevent such reactions from dogs. This website also contains information to teach your children to help them avoid dog bites and attacks. NoDogBites.Org provides the following suggestions: How do you avoid getting bit by a dog? Start by being polite and respecting the dog’s personal space. Never approaching an unfamiliar dog, especially one who’s tied or confined behind a fence or in a car. Don’t pet a dog—even your own—without letting him see and sniff you first.Don’t disturb a dog while she’s sleeping, eating, chewing on a toy, or caring for puppies. Be cautious around strange dogs. Always assume that a dog who doesn’t know you may see you as an intruder or a threat.Pay attention to the dog’s body language. Put a safe amount of space between yourself and a dog if you see the following signals (illustrated in the video above), that the dog is uncomfortable and might feel the need to bite: tensed body stiff tail pulled back head and/or ears furrowed brow eyes rolled so the whites are visible yawning flicking tongue intense stare backing away When putting space between yourself and a dog who might bite, never turn your back on him dog and run away. A dog’s natural instinct will be to chase and catch you. What to do if you think a dog...